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place to be once they settle this thing. the third and the most important thing is the u.s. economy is the most vibrant, adaptable, innovative and creative economy on the planet. i think that means we're coming out and starting to see that in many sectors today. we're bullish and think you need to look at this on a positive frame. >> maria, i'm less bullish than that. that sounds very optimistic. i would love to believe that, but if you compare valuations of equities versus bonds, yes, there's a huge spread right now, but that doesn't necessarily make equities really cheap. it's just a relative trade. i think, also, yes, we're a vibrant economy. we certainly are a strong economy. i think it's really unsustainable, the level of debt that we have in this country. we have $1 trillion in debt. i heard an incredibly succinct way of describing this. rick santelli actually said it this morning about how you can't say you're cutting $800 billion when really $80 billion is really from wars that are just going away. that's not really a cut. that's taking away the addition. i think you need to
, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public on their side. but if you talk to people in washington, there's still this sense that at a last minute, reason will prevail, but there's not a lot of optimism. you know this and my colleagues know this, more and more people are talking about the threat. not only if you don't deal with this, you'll send the united states back in a recession, but that the global economy is teetering. they
to focus on this major threat to the economy. i wish others had. it would have given us more time to fix this major problem. at least now there's a focus on one thing and one dangerous man. a man who is not elected. who has never run pour office and is standing in the way after potential economic disaster. he's the ideological godfather of the tea party. grover norquist has been the driving force behind the anti-tax movement. his goal, to take big government and, in his words, drown it in the bathtub. norquist's weapon is the taxpayer protection pledge, which was at one point signed by 95% of gop members of congress. >> can you raise your hand if you feel so strongly about not raising taxes? >> on the campaign trail this year, only one republican presidential candidate, jon huntsman, dared to cross him. norquist has clout. he's called the most powerful unelected man in america today. >> he signed a pledge, it's without congress. >> that pledge is for that congress. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. >> republicans are jumping ship and supporting unspecified r revenue hikes to help cut t
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: not surprisingly, democratic house leader nancy pelosi had precisely the opposite explanation for what is behind this stalemate. she says republicans simply echoing the white house are going to have to buckle on the issue of the top rates. >> the only obstacle standing in the way of middle income tax relief are the republicans unwillingness to ask the top 2% to pay their fair share. >> but tyler, as you suggested, this is all a work in progress. the thing we cannot see that is not visible to the public or to the press is what's going on behind the scenes. staff discussions resumed yesterday. don't know how fruitful. i haven't gotten much of a signal from people on either side that a deal is close, but they're work rg at it and sometimes these situations can turn around quickly. >> john, what of the reports today that perhaps at some point the republicans in the house and in the senate would go along with the idea of extending the bus
the divisions in washington are may be so large we will harm our economy and harm our problem as they fail to solve problems and work these things out. over the past year, we have been joined by 300,000 saturdays, 100 of the leading ceoas, and small businesses who have said we need fix the debt, that we know. but we wanted to create a different kind of campaign where we come to washington, and while you have so many folks on side saying, "don't touch this. don't touch this. take this off the table." suddenly you're left with nothing on the table to fick the problem. we wanted to create a broad-based bipartisan group to work with members of congress to come up way deal. over the past week, we met with over 50 members of congress. we had very productive meetings with both the white house and the republican leadership basically saying we know we need a plan that will be big enough to fix the problem and biexprs balanced, and we want to help you come to that-- >> schieffer: let me just talk to you, mark zandi. you're our economic forecasters. ent to just go back to the beginning to try to help
like republicans want? >> here is what is at stake. economy is on the brink potentially of going to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious
, doesn't you agree, would be tremendous not only to him but to the economy and to our country. >> and we want to bring in and say good morning to congresswoman diane black, a republican from tennessee, a member of the house budget and ways and means committee. congresswoman, is great to have you with me right now. as we speak, house minority leader nancy pelosi is giving her briefing this morning. weep put that up for everybody to see. when we talk about where we are in the staging of all of this, all the drama, the back and forth, the clock ticking, americans truly watching this, you think that the house would be in session today but you all closed up house day early, streamed out yesterday in a walkout. what gives? how do you explain this to the american people when they expect you should be at work trying to resolve this? >> i'm not sure you would call it a walkout. we're waiting for the president to act. we have laid something on the table and we continue to be stalemated by the president and his administration. i am so disappointed that the treasury, geithner, said yesterday they're
and the speaker of house about to address perhaps this and other things. >> our economy and threatening jobs and the white house has wasted another week. you know, eight days ago secretary of state geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes the president campaigned on. and they had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts. and -- indefinite, infinite, increase of the debt limit like forever. four days ago we offer ad serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted deliberate strategy the slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending problem. not a receive knew problem. the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe that
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
economy would take off and our country would be so much better off. >> chris, you understand the politics of the house from both sides. can john boehner cut a deal without eric cantor and paul ryan? >> i have a pretty good understanding of the house, but i always am a little afraid of wandering into house republican leadership politics. just to broaden the question a little bit -- i think the question is whether or not the speaker is going to be able to bring a good part of his caucus with him. that or require a united leadership team. >> i am talking short-term -- the next two or three weeks. >> i think that is going to be a requirement. i think one of the decisions the speaker will have to make is whether he is prepared to put a agreement on the floor of the house that might not have a majority of the republicans in the house in support. that is one of the questions. senator corker points out that there are a number of ways you can get to a yes on this, but it is not clear if there is a way to get to yes that necessarily brings a majority of house republicans. not that we cannot get a m
stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can it have no impact whatsoever? it seems curious to me. >> it does call into question whether these numbers can be accurate. we have been starting to think let's check accuracy. why isn't this done by s.a.p.?
the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the president and the speaker are going to get in a room and have some very serious dialogue as this gets closer. my view is that both the administration and the republicans would prefer to put a deal together, and the outlines of that are on the table. >> you talk about the cliff or the abyss? we need to separate the two. it would be nice to have like a bridge to that $4 trillion deal that includes entitlement, tax reform. in fact, i don't know why the president isn't talking about that more with the simpson-bowles. >> the president did say that he doesn't think there's anything we can get done. >> as a bridge to that. always talking about the high end. >> actually, joe, i think the administration wants to see a deal come together here. >> for what, the fiscal cliff or the fiscal abyss? >> for both. >> for both. >> so that a down
, 146,000 new jobs. it's good news for the economy and good news for the president. president obama's approval rating is at a three-year rate. 53%. and 53% say they trust president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff. compared to just 36% who trust republicans in congress. also today speaker boehner said he wouldn't rule out an agreement to raise taxes as part of a fiscal cliff deal. but he also said there's no progress. this is what winning looks like. joining me now, e.j. dionne and thank you both for your time. senator solis, the jobless rate is at a four-year low. that's quite an achievement. >> yes, reverend re. but we still need to do more. in sectors like retail and health care and tourism and hospitality. we need to do more because people are still suffering. we've got to put jobs back in infrastructure and construction and put our teachers. that's why the president is working so hard so we don't go off the fiscal cliff so we keep the most vulnerable people out of harm's way. to pay $2,200. we've got to talk about fairness here and i'm very excited that the public is listening t
of an agreement that's good for the economy is if a group of republicans decide they're going to block and increase in tax rates on the wealthiest americans. i think it's unlikely they will choose to do, that of course, because there's so much at stake. >> schieffer: in all seriousness, i'm told mitch mcconnell laughed when you handed in this proposal. is that true? >> they're in a hard position, bob. they really are in a difficult position. and they're going to have to figure out their politics of what they do next and they're trying to figure that out right now. we're going to work very hard at this and we're going to keep talking to each other. and, again, i think we have a very good chance for coming together on an agreement that not just protects 98% of americans from a tax increase and protects the economy from deeply damaging upfront spending cuts and protects the med from leaving us vulnerable to, you know, periodic threats of defaults by politicians, i think we can do better than that and do something good for the long-term future of the american economy. >> schieffer: did you
a very fragile economy and an emerging and helpful nation and you can't tax your way out of this baby. this is impossible. and when these people zero in-- as erskine said they zero in on taxes, taxes, taxes, we said you've got revenue one to four, three times spending cuts versus one of revenue, but you go into the code and like this one, you go to home mortgage interest deduction and the housing industry guys, all the lobbyists go nuts. we said, look, we're not going to take it away from you but it doesn't need to be a million buck on a second home. we said take it to 500,000, give everybody a 12.5% nonrefundable tax credit which helps the little guy. and they go, "oh, yeah, i guess that might work." everybody is in the game. this will be savagery, full-page ads, ladies, old charge, veterans, simpson-bowles are doing their tricks out there. hang on tight. it's going to be a real, real struggle. >> schieffer: let me just ask you, you caught a lot of people's attention, including ourselves last week, when you did this video on internet to try to get young people-- >> eskind, will you q
revenue. >> the economy is in a different position, the president actually did sign into law a series of cuts, he's proposed a lot in his 2013 budget. it's not like he's been stagnant. we've been having this argument throughout the presidential campaign and guess what? as we keep saying, americans said we're not buying it. the conditions have changed, the economy has changed, i think the outlook in the picture has changed. that's part of the reason the president is so firm about not going back to the debt ceiling conversation again and creating that level of instability and not bending on this issue of raisings the rates on the top 2%. >> yeah. i think -- >> go ahead. >> it's an important point. i think the american people are seeing that the president has already agreed to more than a year ago to that $1 trillion of cuts. that was 100% in cuts as part of the budget control act and he's always said we need a balanced approach. we can't do it through cuts alone. he has proposed additional cuts as part of the process but you need to have that revenue component to have the balanced appro
back this morning, a new report finds that exporting nat gas will actually help the u.s. economy, but not every day is a winner. >>> vice chairman alan blinder will tell us what he thinks. >>> a new study from the federal government shows exporting u.s. natural gas overseas has the potential to reshape the global energy markets. the obama administration has said the study will be central to the decision on whether to export. he said exporting the gas would be a bigger impact on the economy. >> slap in the face of dow chemical. of coke, not coke the beverage company. but this was something that was hotly disputed within the romney campaign. he really let this stuff go because the romney campaign had some very big givers that were chemical companies. >> do we know, say, very bad, how much will prices conceivableably go up if we become an exporter of natural gas? is it that great a difference? >> we burn offer more natural gas than we use. burn off, in other words literally, you see those flames, we flare more than we use. so we got a real excess of this stuff. >> the government say
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
but the economy will roar back. maybe, just maybe, zombies for obama will realize he has no clue when it comes to the economy. or we don't double dip to the recession. and the debt dissolves to pay the way for the 2016 conservatives. take your chance and take medicine now. over the long run, better for the economy. >> kimberly: call his bluff. be strong at the negotiating table to make sure you can do what is best in interest of the country. these are tough time and you have to stand your ground. if you look at the recent polling, obama dropped three points. in polling with the gallup poll. people aren't happy with him anyway. >> eric: there is a counterproposal, around $800 billion in revenue through tax reform. they go through spending cuts. none of the spending cuts in obama's plan. are we so far apart we will go up or is there a meeting ground? 'canes is smart of the republicans. last week, geithner to the treasury secretary and laughed at. across the board, left and right commentators said i think president obama is overplaying the hand here. they have a plan to get him what he campaigned
the economy to go over the fiscal cliff? what kind of reaction might we see in the market if that were to materialize? >> well, if we saw the market sell off in a big way, i don't think anybody believes we're going to go over the fiscal cliff. there will be some sort of resolution. they'll come up with some tax cuts, some breaks in spending, and probably kick the can down the road on a lot of it. i love the way this market is acting. it's not selling off with all the bad news, all the bickering, all the bad words on each side. you've got to love the way that this market is holding up here. doesn't mean investors need to be carefree, but overall, it looks like the market is setting up with a lot of negative sentiment out there. looks like there's a lot of opportunity for a big run higher once we get some form of resolution. i really believe we're going to get it. >> you think by year end? >> i really do. i think they want to go home for christmas. they're not going to want to not go home for christmas. you can always count on politicians to do the right thing when all other options have
. whether it's the best solutioner to the economy is an entirely different story. this is a political and ideological argument and we'll see who wins. martha: there is a couple ways this could go. one is to land in the middle. you have $800 billion and $1.6 trillion. the other is for one side to say no deal. we'll let you go over the fiscal cliff and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: at the last minute i think there will be a deal. i think republicans will retreat and say okay, you can have higher tax rates but only on people making a half million dollars a year. the president will say, okay, but we'll only discuss -- we'll think about, we'll promise spending cuts in the future. it will be a way of kicking the can down the road. martha: charles krauthammer have a will the more leverage than republicans realize. the president does not want us to go into a recession. we'll talk about that coming up. bill: democrats are all about tax hike and republicans argue massive spending programs like medicare and social security must be dealt with in any kind of deal if you want to bring count
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
in the same category for "back to work, why we need smart government for a strong economy." the returns for this race will be on february 10th when we'll find out who won. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." did republican efforts to suppress the vote backfire this time? in dozens of states they made efforts to keep people, especially minorities and poor people, from getting to the ballot box. they shortened early voting periods. well, it didn't work. minority turnout remained steady from 2008, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask ju
wealthy americans are the ones who are creating the jobs and helping to turn this economy around. that remains the big sticking point. those bush era tax cuts, white house saying it should be extended for middle class americans but not for those upper income americans, carol. >> how seriously should we take these negotiations? both sides are negotiating in public, not the greatest way to negotiate in the world, right? >> reporter: right. you sort of have to take it based on the information they give you. there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes. we've seen this play out over the last four years where both sides will sort of throw these sharp elbows publicly, but then they do hammer something out. we do have to take it seriously. you have to get a sense that both sides understand the serious nature of this fiscal cliff and they do want a deal to get done. so they are looking for ways to find some kind of agreement. they are looking at outside groups today as well. the president will meet with half a dozen governors, arkansas, minnesota, utah, wisconsin, republican governor fro
cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> reporter: this morning in his weekly address, president obama is holding a hard line on raising rates for the wealthy. >> and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, then we're also go to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> reporter: but how much higher could be the key to compromise. the top tax rate is set to rise from 35 to 39.6% on january 1st. when asked if a middle ground could be found, both boehner and bide enshowed wiggle room. >> the top brackets have to go up. this is not a negotiatiable issue. theoretically we could negotiate how far up. >> at a local restaurant, the owner has seen enough of washington gridlock. >> i wish those lawmakers would get their acts together and get it done and try to help everybody. it would be good if they could do it before the holidays are over. >> reporter: she said it, alex. now john boehner after that comment yesterday he walked back. he took the h
this was for the economy. this is a multiyear low reading in the manufacturing numbers. we haven't seen a number like this since 2009. we haven't seen an employment index number like this since september of 2009, the last time it was at this level, unemployment, 9.8%. we have a nonfarm payrolls number coming out on friday. you'll be lucky to see a positive number in front of that. i don't see how the market overcomes that kind of thing. independent of all this jibber jabber over the fiscal cliff, the economy is in really rough shape now. >> it is. we're seeing businesses cut back, getting ready for the eventuality they see coming, no deal by december 31st this worsening. sam, how do you want to be invested in 2013? where is the growth in the economy coming from, if anywhere? >> i think the growth is coming from an improvement in the housing sector. i think we are starting to see a slowdown in the job loss from the government sector. so, i think we're going to be seeing a better than half speed recovery. so, you do want to be taking a balanced approach. we do favor the consumer discretionary at this p
't blow up the world economy for no good reason. it's taking the sharp knife covered in explosives away from a kid who has a lot of temper tantrums. it's a good thing to do. the white house calls it the mcconnell plan because it's based on an idea that mitch mcconnell proposed become in july 2011. but even though it is mitch mcconnell's idea, even though he came up with it, mitch mcconnell is not for it. mitch mcconnell at this point does not support the mcconnell plan at all. he didn't think democrats did either. and yesterday he wanted to call their bluff. now that is when c-span 2 suddenly became amazing television. yesterday afternoon mitch mcconnell asked the senate to move to an immediate vote on the mcconnell plan. vote on it now. you figured harry reid would back down. prove that even democrats don't like this idea. but reid did not back down. he doubled down. he said, yeah, let's vote on the plan. but let's move to an immediate up or down vote. no filibuster, no 60-vote requirement, let's see if it gets 51. if so, it's passed. at which point, mcconnell kind of filibustered his
ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up and oracle will play out three-quarters of dividends this year. >>> more strength in housing this morning. toll brothers earnings top expectations. we'll begin with the fiscal cliff. governors are set to meet today with the president and congressional leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit reduction measures on their state budgebu. the latest gop offer would overhaul the tax code, raise $800 billion in new revenue but seek $600 billion in health savings, net savings add up to about $2.2 trillion over ten years. boehner called the white house's original offer la la land and it does appear that even though at one point bowles endorsed a blueprint like this, he's trying to distance himself from it right now. >> the president got re-elected. he's claiming he got re-elected in part because he wants to tax that 2%. he cannot go back on that. in the meantime, congress most of the republicans signed the grover n
. >>> we get a critical snapshot of the economy this morning. when we'll learn if hurricane sandy also devastated the nation's job market. >>> incredible crash. a jewelry store gets a drive-through. an employee inches from a very different outcome. >>> and 24/7? is round-the-clock shopping the next trend in holiday retailing? one megadepartment store is betting on it. >>> good friday morning, everyone. we do begin with breaking news out of japan right now. a strong earthquake hit the northeastern part of the country this morning. and it has triggered a tsunami warning. >> the quake measured a 7.3. it was centered in the pacific ocean. it was strong enough to cause buildings to sway in tokyo for several minutes. abc's akiko fujita is in tokyo with the very latest by phone. high, akiko. >> reporter: you're right. this quake hit about 5:18 p.m. local time. this is the largest quake we have felt in tokyo this year. to give you an idea of the intensity, in japan, they have a one to seven scale. this was about a five. it's a very strong quake, felt all the way out here. the big concern right
effects on the economy. the other area that democrats want to raise taxes are on investment income, things like capital gains, dividend income. now, those will jump significantly. here's the thing. very few of these benefits affect middle class workers. it does affect the higher income earners and the question you have to ask is will it affect their spending patterns and the thinking amongst democrats and among many liberal economists is that you don't spend the marginal money that you earn in the same way you spend the core money that you earn, so the impact won't be as big. it's not to say that there's no impact and it would be better for the economy if we were not raising taxes on anybody and possibly lowering taxes, but there's a doomsday scenario that's been put out there about what would happen if you raise taxes on the top 2%. we don't have a lot of studies to back that up. >> you say not a lot of studies to back that up because that is the principle republican argument. they say the recovery is so weak, if you raise taxes on the top 2% right now you will hurt the job creators at a
nutritionally unfit to learn. the point about the economy, this is the short-sighted thinking so many people have about government expenditures, there is absolutely government waste, fraud, abuse, but when it comes to programs like this, you actually get a long-term and immediate benefit from that expenditure of taxpayer dollars. >> nobody can tell me this is a wasteful amount of food for an american. >> if i was on food stamps or s.n.a.p. program and i used my money, that dollar that i spend on my food actually comes -- recycles through the economy and produces $1.70 or more of a benefit to our gdp because you know what, people produce this food. the truckers depend on that. the store owners. it actually creates jobs in communities have millions of dollars of money that people are expending. >> what do you think about this, though, because there's another staggering statistic that 40% of all food supply in america each year is thrown away, discarded by americans, which works out to equivalent of $2,275 annually in food. it's a staggering amount of food tossed away. there is a real disconnec
we need smart government for a strong economy. the returns for this ration will be on february 10th when we'll find out who won. r heart health. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? house garden and encourages we'll be right bachouse garden we'll be right bachouse garden we'll be right bac >>> welcome back to "hardball." did republican efforts to suppress the vote backfire this time? in dozens of states they made efforts to keep people, especially minorities and poor people, from getting to the ba ballot box. they shortened early voting periods. well, it didn't work. minority turnout remained steady from 2008 and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempt at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in l
they were in 1980 or 1950, the question is given the world today and the other economies do we have a competitive tax system and i think our slow going economy under president obama says we don't. >> the new york times though makes a mention of, just a sort of a passing mention in this massive article, by the way, about the need to cut spending like one or two sentences about the need-- >> and i think that milton freedman brought us, that spending is really the tax bill. it's just delayed. so, every toll the government spends eventually they're going to have to take it from someone, either in taxes or in inflation, so, this is why you're seeing a lack of business investment is because this massive spending and huge debt tells every business owner, every investor, big tax are are coming to eventually pay for this. >> what was the point of the piece? i know there's hand wringing out there, maybe the folks on the right say under obama our taxes have gone up and we may more in taxes than we've ever paid and attempt to say, we're not-- >> this is long-term by the president and his allies
our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >>> holiday hiring may have given a big boost to the jobs report released yesterday. retail hirers hired more people than any month on record since 1939. 146,000 jobs were added to the economy last month, and the unemployment rate fell to a four-year low of 7.7% partly because thousands have just simply stopped looking for work. >>> more good news for your wallet. gas prices are down to an average of $3.36. it is the 16th consecutive time the price has dropped. the highest price for a gallon of regular is in high where it's $4.02. >>> he served his party as a republican, and now charlie crist is a proud democrat. he posted a twitter photo showing his registration papers, showing he is proud and honored to join the party in the home of president obama. crist ran for the u.s. senate as an independent in 2010, but was defeated by marco rubio. some are speculating this move is in p
for the american economy. >> what great news, i think. don't you think so, mark mckinnon? i loved the president's tone there, talking about how a deal could be done. and i was critical of him when he did a campaign event up in philadelphia -- or pennsylvania a couple days ago when he wasn't talking to boehner. but if he's talking to boehner one on one and they're going to start this discussion, they go out and make statements publicly and then privately, i think it's a great step forward. >> i think it's a terrific development. i think that the president and boehner created a lot of chemistry over the years and that the distractions have come from other constituencies that have been in the room. i think that they both understand that this is important to both their legacies. and so they have an opportunity for them to just deal together one on one is a terrific development. >> and the president looking -- and you as a businessperson knows this, and i think we've all been in the position of negotiating and you say, okay, do we want to deal with him, or do we want to cut him out at the knees and
hit the economy hard. today we are hearing more from both the president and from republicans. with me now, nbc news white house correspondent mike viqueira. viq, does there appear to be any progress? >> reporter: i don't think so, craig, and we're watching it pretty closely. we thought perhaps after yesterday there would be. but this morning in his weekly address the president says no compromise. those top late rates for the w will raise one way or the other, but the wiggle room may be raise by how much. visiting a d.c.-area diner, vice president joe biden said if the gop were willing, the debt deal could be done in short order. >> it would take 15 minutes from the time the decision was made by the speaker of the house to pass and make permanent the middle-class tax cut. the president would probably have me sprint up to the hill to bring the bill down for him to sign. >> reporter: but even after the latest in a series of private calls with the president, house speaker john boehner says the white house is stone walling. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our econo
is concerned about uncertainty. there is no uncertainty like the prospect that the largest economy that holds the world's reserve currency potentially defaults on its debts, that we give out the basic notion that the united states stands behind its obligations. we cannot afford -- host: whil"the wall street journal." guest: the president does not want to negotiate with the republicans on the debt ceiling. that is like giving a son or daughter a credit card to do with it as they want freely. i think the president has to admit that both sides have tried to break measures and legislations to the table that would reduce the debt ceiling. the president -- look at how the deficit has quadrupled since he has been in the white house and he wants to spend more money on his special programs. it will give him a full range to spend as he likes without any kind of restriction. it would be irresponsible for republicans and democrats to give this president that kind of power. host: jeff, good morning. caller: good morning. with republicans being cornered as far as the blame, why don't the republicans just v
dicker, author of oil he's endless bid, taming the unreliable price of oil to secure our economy, a cnbc contributor and union blake director of strirmtal affairs for hometown energy group, independent energy consulting firm with clients in the oil and gas industry. republican senator rand paul of kentucky on wenz lambbaased the actress ashley judd report considering a run for senate there. he said her opposition to one industry in particular would doom her candidacy. >> she's way damn to liberal for our country and state. she hateses or big heest industry, coal. good luck bringing the i hate coal message to kentucky. >> it shows a misunderstanding of his own state's economy. according to data from the bureau of economic analysis, mining is only the 13th largest industry in kentucky by gdp. manufacturing is at the top of the list. if you go by jobs, mining is anl 15th in the state. health care is at the top of list with eight times the number of workers. paul's claiming are flat wrong, but they show a deep anxiety and defensiveness about the coal industry on the wane in america. today co
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